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Take any YouTube or Vimeo video & create a quiz for it. Give it a try! Create a video lesson

By mermaid72

Students are going to work with Present Simple and Present Continuous Tenses as well as with synonyms.

By BrendaSnyder10

Students will have to identify contractions within the video and gap fill/sentence scramble

By Kisdobos

Students have to unscramble 8 present continuous sentences that describe what is happening in the scene.

By mermaid72

Students will have to do some tasks such as putting words in order or fill the gap while listening. vocabulary is easy and useful.

By Kisdobos

This video quiz offers practice in some place and movement prepositions: back, after, onto, out of, on top of, over, in, down, away, off, between. Students need to fill in the missing preposition in each sentence.

By mermaid72

There are a few really easy tasks to do. They include working with Present Continuous Tense. Vocabulary includes transport, rooms, buildings, sport.

By mermaid72

Young students are going to complete some pretty easy exercises based on the listening. Vocabulary is aimed at elementary level students.

By dafana2

Answer the questions about which room the little boy is in. Questions are open answer and in complete sentences.

By actiasluna

This exercise was made for French-speaking students. They sometimes have to answer questions in French or to fill in sentences using the words they just heard and read.

By Kisdobos

8 gapfill questions where the students need to fill in various prepositions of place into the gaps: in front of, outside, in, under, opposite, next to, above, on top of. I am also including some comprehension question with each preposition question You can get students to answer after solving each grammar task, or in the end. The comprehension questions are: 1. Why is the nest up there? 2. Where is the mother of the little pigeons? 3. What will their mother bring for the little ones when she comes back? 4. Where are the pigeons going? 5. What do the pigeons want? 6. What are they trying to do? 7. What are they planning to do? 8. Why do they not want to eat the worm?

By Kisdobos

This video quiz contains 6 scrambled sentence tasks to practice forming present simple, present continuous and past simple questions. Once the students have unscrambled the sentences, they should make up some more questions on their own, and act out a role play with a partner (they can also improvise questions on-the-fly during the role play). Student A: a child or another animal (e.g. a ladybug, another pigeons, a cat - to add some drama maybe). Student B: one of the little pigeons.
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By Kisdobos

This video quiz offers practice in some place and movement prepositions: back, after, onto, out of, on top of, over, in, down, away, off, between. Students need to fill in the missing preposition in each sentence.

By mermaid72

Students will have to do some tasks such as putting words in order or fill the gap while listening. vocabulary is easy and useful.
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By Kisdobos

This minion compilation lends itself to discussing classroom rules for the coming year in a relaxed, humorous way. There are Q&A's to accompany seven of the eleven classroom rules illustrated in the video. All the questions intend to clarify the meaning and purpose of these rules. There are 6 answer options for each question, out of which either two or three options are right (so the instruction tells students to mark all right answers). The complete list of classroom rules featured in the video: 1. No gum. 2. Be a good friend. 3. Control bodily functions 4. Always follow directions and listen to the teacher. 5. Don't tease or bully others. 6. Don't waste time when you leave the room. 7. Keep your hands to yourself. 8. Respect other learners by not disrupting. 9. Be supportive when working in groups. 10. Keep cellphones turned off in backbacks. 11. Ask for help when you need it. You can put students in pairs or small groups to work out the answer collaboratively. If the level of vocabulary is a bit too difficult for your class, you can either get rid of some of the answer options, pre-teach vocabulary or try to dumb down (rephrase) the sentences for lower levels. If any of the class rules do not apply in your classroom (e.g. you don't have a no cellphone policy), you can simply "copy & edit" the video quiz and cut out the undesired parts of the video (with the "scissor" tool in the video editor). Lesson plan, discussion questions and vocabulary list also provided below.

By yesandno

The students will be asked to find a certain object on the screen. It should be quite a simple exercise to complete.

By Kisdobos

This is a simple sentence unscrambling task to let students practice getting the word order right in past simple and past continuous sentences, but it's also meant as a lighthearted, amusing warmer to start one of your classes when your students come back to school after the summer break. Also, it could serve as a reminder to your students to tone down their craziness a bit now that they're back to school. :) Even though many of the movement verbs may be above A1 level, with the visual cues the task becomes doable for A1 level students, as well.

By Kisdobos

Students have to reassemble present continuous sentences. There are a few present simple, past simple and future simple verbs included here and there. There are also several infinitive structures (clauses of purpose) in the sentences.

By olgagonz32

Answer questions about Tom's routine. Students watch, listen and read about Tom. They answer questions to practice 3 person singular. They also have to unscramble sentences.

By mermaid72

The students are going to work with synonyms and Present Continuous structures. They have to know basic verbs and adjectives

By alexvarley

Short video clip with linked questions. Question types include open ended, multiple choice and unscramble the sentence

By mermaid72

The students are going to work with numerous tasks based on listening and checking understanding skills. However the vocabulary is pretty easy.

By Kisdobos

Students are asked to complete the subtitles that I created for this silent film. There are 14 gapfill questions with always one word missing. There are diverse language items to be practised: basic verbs, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, adverbs, commands, question words, present/past/future tense statements, so students will need to use their whole repertoire of English language knowledge.

By Kisdobos

There are only three questions based on the visuals: students have to spot the only thing out of 5 that wasn't seen in the video. The reason I didn't make more questions is because, firstly, it's just a 1-minute video with quickly moving images, so it's kind of hard to really focus on anything. Secondly, my main goal was to use it as a springboard to introducing the idea of a video diary and an upcoming 30-day video diary project.

By Kisdobos

Pupils hone their listening comprehension skills listening to the summer stories of a British college student. Coming back to school after summer I'd like to talk about how everyone's summer was. But it's sometimes hard to break the ice after the summer and get people sharing, so first I will show this video to get people more relaxed and in the mood for storytelling. I chose to create a listening task because I found his British accent quite difficult to understand at first (I speak US English, while I don't so much hear the British accent either - in online videos or film). The questions are a mixture of basic comprehension ones (students have to catch the name of a festival, for example) and deep comprehension ones (they have to get the gist of a story). Disclaimer: I cut out most of the bad words he uses (and being a teenager he uses a few), but I didn't manage to cut out all, so there remain occasional "sh*ts" and "f*cking awesome's" here and there. Besides, he mentions drinking in the beginning, which - again - may be seen as inappropriate in your school and better to cut out from the video. Luckily, you may cut out every last instance of bad words if you "copy & edit" my quiz - you just need to sacrifice a few questions. I feel I need to explain why I am making a video lesson based on a teenager who talks about drinking and uses bad words, because it's a controversial choice and maybe even you will frown upon it. The reason is that I want to prepare my students to understand the language that's spoken in the real world. If they ever get to hang out with British teenagers, chances are that they're gonna be immersed in the world and language of characters just like our protagonist, so I reckon they'd better understand it. The second reason is that I value authenticity very highly. Actually, I am so glad that I never have to rely on coursebook audio or video again, because I can use stuff from the real world. In fact, I want to open a window to the world, which sometimes means that I want to be educational and broaden the horizon of my students, while in other cases I just want to show them how other cultures are like, for example show them a British teen. It doesn't mean that I encourage swearing, or drinking for that matter, but since both of these are the reality of many teenagers, in my classes I don't want to present an artificial picture of the world doctored to be school-friendly, all rosy and innocent. I am OK with presenting the world in my classes as it is - as long as I feel we are learning something from it. In this case, some UK slang words and understanding the fast-talking, mumbling speech of a British teen. So that's my attitude to showing authentic material in a nutshell.

By mermaid72

Students are going to work with the synonyms and Present Continous structures ( statements and questions).